Billion Year Spree: The True History of Science Fiction

  • Title: Billion Year Spree: The True History of Science Fiction
  • Author: Brian W. Aldiss
  • ISBN: 9780805204506
  • Page: 462
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
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    • ☆ Billion Year Spree: The True History of Science Fiction || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Brian W. Aldiss
      462 Brian W. Aldiss
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Billion Year Spree: The True History of Science Fiction || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Brian W. Aldiss
      Posted by:Brian W. Aldiss
      Published :2018-09-19T05:59:44+00:00

    About Brian W. Aldiss


    1. Pseudonyms Jael Cracken, Peter Pica, John Runciman, C.C Shackleton, Arch Mendicant, Doc Peristyle.Brian Wilson Aldiss was one of the most important voices in science fiction writing today He wrote his first novel while working as a bookseller in Oxford Shortly afterwards he wrote his first work of science fiction and soon gained international recognition Adored for his innovative literary techniques, evocative plots and irresistible characters, he became a Grand Master of Science Fiction in 1999 Brian Aldiss died on August 19, 2017, just after celebrating his 92th birthday with his family and closest friends.Brian W Aldiss Group on Good Reads


    125 Comments


    1. The subtitle is fairly self-explanatory. Aldiss lays out the history of science fiction as a literary genre in a non-chronological format. For instance, the exploration of some ancient Roman fantasies often mistaken for science fiction occurs in chapter three, after Aldiss describes some eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature. Aldiss's main contention is that science fiction started as a "lively sub-genre of the Gothic," beginning with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Intriguingly, he added t [...]

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    2. Less a survey of must-read sci-fi classics than a real chronology of fantasy fiction and its myriad offshoots, this brainy book reads like a legitimate history tome. Indeed, it's used as a textbook in several science-fiction literature courses in British universities.To be fair, Aldiss is a learned scholar in his field, having written and edited for the pulps as well as producing his own voluminous output of both genre and non-genre books. But while he is extremely opinionated, and has a bit of [...]

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    3. A hugely important work. Brian began the process of pulling together the history of SF which, required a level of analysis and categorisation that we take for granted today. He defines the early literary strands that grow, thicken and mutate into the genre, going up to 1973 in my edition. His reasoning behind his narrative is clear and his coverage of inputs to the genre is fairly comprehensive. I might weight some of those early inputs differently but this is only a matter of degree. In the int [...]

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    4. This is an easy read; it's pleasing to have an author as literary critic. It's also informative (up to the time it was written), though sometimes Mr. Aldiss's opinions--particularly his condemnations--differ considerably from my more accepting tastes.The book picks an Anglo-centric definition of SF, moderated when applied to more recent years(relative to the time of writing). When applied to earlier eras it excludes books that, for example, a French speaker would include. I didn't find this a se [...]

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    5. What can I say? This book is a history, so it is as it must be: droll and full of long lists that are only informative to those who have a full knowledge of the books and authors listed already. Of course, it illuminates several interesting trends, occurrences, and definitions that I was not familiar with. That's a given. It is just not really the sort of light reading that most science fiction fans are looking for, ironically. I think the author was a bit bombastic, but overall, it was interest [...]

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    6. After putting this down, I wanted to find much of what Aldiss mentioned. Many of the titles are no longer in print.With our portable digital guides, I can run a search and find electronic versions, irony-of-ironies.Inevitably, I must wipe the tears and stutter past sputtering lips: "It's not the same"

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    7. the text book for a college SF class. i was reading the night Lenon was killed

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    8. His "Trillion Year Spree" is an updated version of this. I just skimmed to make sure it was pretty much the same and read the last chapter, because that was somewhat different.

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